Recommendations For Fully Vaccinated Immunosuppressed Individuals

We hope you find the following information about recommendations for fully vaccinated immunosuppressed individual, as well as COVID-19 vaccine booster doses helpful.

At this time, there are limited data on vaccine protection in people who are immunocompromised. Further, data on which immunocompromising conditions might affect response to the COVID-19 vaccine and the magnitude of risk are not available. Examples of such immunocompromising conditions likely include, but might not be limited to, receiving chemotherapy for cancer, hematologic malignancies, being within one year from receiving a hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplant, untreated HIV infection with CD4 T lymphocyte count < 200, combined primary immunodeficiency disorder, and taking immunosuppressive medications (e.g., drugs to suppress rejection of transplanted organs or to treat rheumatologic conditions such as mycophenolate and rituximab, receipt of prednisone >20mg/day for more than 14 days.) In general, healthcare facilities should continue to follow the infection prevention and control recommendations for unvaccinated individuals (e.g., quarantine, testing) when caring for fully vaccinated individuals with an immunocompromising condition.

This information can also be found on CDC’s website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/infection-control-after-vaccination.html.

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective at protecting you from getting sick. You are considered fully vaccinated:

  • 2 weeks after your second dose in a 2-dose vaccine series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or
  • 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine.

If you don't meet these requirements, you are NOT fully vaccinated. Keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated.

Once you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did before the pandemic without wearing a mask or physically distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations. This includes local business and workplace guidance.

If you've been around someone who has COVID-19, you do not need to stay away from others or get tested unless you have symptoms. However, you should still watch out for symptoms of COVID-19. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested and stay home and away from others.

And people who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken the immune system should talk to their healthcare provider to discuss their activities. They may need to keep taking all precautions to prevent COVID-19.

Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine only requires 1 dose.

The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines each require 2 shots. The timing between your first and second shots depends on which vaccine you receive:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine doses should be given at least 3 weeks (21 days) apart.
  • Moderna vaccine doses should be given at least 1 month (28 days) apart.

For the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, CDC recommends receiving both doses. Very limited data are available on the effectiveness of a single dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, and available data indicate that 2 doses are needed for optimal protection.

The need for and timing for COVID-19 booster doses have not been established. No additional doses are recommended at this time. For more information, visit the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/clinical-considerations.html#Booster-doses

For more information, please visit the following CDC websites:

CDC Resources

When You’ve Been Fully Vaccinated
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated.html

Frequently Asked Questions About COVID-19 Vaccination
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html

How to Protect Yourself & Others
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html

U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Product Information
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/index.html

Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/clinical-considerations.html

Benefits of Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/vaccine-benefits.html

CDC’s COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Recommendations
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations.html

***Feedback about your experience with CDC-INFO is important to us and will help us continue to improve. Please rate your interaction by completing this short survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FKXRCG5?CaseId=CDC-1706778-B4L8V5 

Responses are kept completely confidential.***

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Links to nonfederal organizations are provided as a service. Links are not an endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the federal 

We hope you find the following information about recommendations for fully vaccinated immunosuppressed individual, as well as COVID-19 vaccine booster doses helpful.

At this time, there are limited data on vaccine protection in people who are immunocompromised. Further, data on which immunocompromising conditions might affect response to the COVID-19 vaccine and the magnitude of risk are not available. Examples of such immunocompromising conditions likely include, but might not be limited to, receiving chemotherapy for cancer, hematologic malignancies, being within one year from receiving a hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplant, untreated HIV infection with CD4 T lymphocyte count < 200, combined primary immunodeficiency disorder, and taking immunosuppressive medications (e.g., drugs to suppress rejection of transplanted organs or to treat rheumatologic conditions such as mycophenolate and rituximab, receipt of prednisone >20mg/day for more than 14 days.) In general, healthcare facilities should continue to follow the infection prevention and control recommendations for unvaccinated individuals (e.g., quarantine, testing) when caring for fully vaccinated individuals with an immunocompromising condition.

This information can also be found on CDC’s website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/infection-control-after-vaccination.html.

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective at protecting you from getting sick. You are considered fully vaccinated:

  • 2 weeks after your second dose in a 2-dose vaccine series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or
  • 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine.

If you don't meet these requirements, you are NOT fully vaccinated. Keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated.

Once you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did before the pandemic without wearing a mask or physically distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations. This includes local business and workplace guidance.

If you've been around someone who has COVID-19, you do not need to stay away from others or get tested unless you have symptoms. However, you should still watch out for symptoms of COVID-19. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested and stay home and away from others.

And people who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken the immune system should talk to their healthcare provider to discuss their activities. They may need to keep taking all precautions to prevent COVID-19.

Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine only requires 1 dose.

The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines each require 2 shots. The timing between your first and second shots depends on which vaccine you receive:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine doses should be given at least 3 weeks (21 days) apart.
  • Moderna vaccine doses should be given at least 1 month (28 days) apart.

For the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, CDC recommends receiving both doses. Very limited data are available on the effectiveness of a single dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, and available data indicate that 2 doses are needed for optimal protection.

The need for and timing for COVID-19 booster doses have not been established. No additional doses are recommended at this time. For more information, visit the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/clinical-considerations.html#Booster-doses

For more information, please visit the following CDC websites:

CDC Resources

When You’ve Been Fully Vaccinated
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated.html

Frequently Asked Questions About COVID-19 Vaccination
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html

How to Protect Yourself & Others
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html

U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Product Information
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/index.html

Interim Clinical Considerations for Use of mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/info-by-product/clinical-considerations.html

Benefits of Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/vaccine-benefits.html

CDC’s COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Recommendations
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations.html

***Feedback about your experience with CDC-INFO is important to us and will help us continue to improve. Please rate your interaction by completing this short survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FKXRCG5?CaseId=CDC-1706778-B4L8V5 

Responses are kept completely confidential.***

------------------------------------------------------------------

Links to nonfederal organizations are provided as a service. Links are not an endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the federal