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Survivor Support: Even though cancer treatment ends, the need for physical and emotional care continues

Survivor Support: Even though cancer treatment ends, the need for physical and emotional care continues

By Ronni Gordon

When Marty Hogan found out at age 34 that he had acute lymphocytic leukemia, a rapidly progressing blood cancer, the news devastated him and his pregnant wife, Whitney. It was 2016, and the doctor gave him a low five-year survival prognosis. 

His mind started to spiral. 

“I was terrified that I wasn’t going to meet my kid and Whitney was going to be in the delivery room by herself,” says Hogan, a dentist in Winnetka.

He did get to meet baby Clark — and baby Phoebe two years after that — but other challenges continue to plague Hogan’s cancer journey. After three and a half years of chemotherapy, he continues to feel the aftereffects of treatment, including headaches, mouth ulcers, neuropathy, rashes, joint pain, loss of taste, and loss of feeling in his fingers, feet, and left leg.

“I’m 38, and I feel like I’m 80,” Hogan says. Now in remission, he adds, “But I’m glad to be alive and to be here, so I’m not going to complain.” 

Read the full article at Chicago Health Online.

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